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Film festival brings movies, educational opportunities to campus

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Posted: 
September 10, 2013

Independent films are made outside the confines of major studios. They typically have smaller budgets and little publicity compared to major motion pictures.

These films however can bring a unique perspective, explore deep topics and are created by people who truly embrace the art of filmmaking.

“I think it's important to bring our film to your campus because people need to understand that filmmaking is no longer something Hollywood has a lock on,” said Morgan Nichols, independent filmmaker. “It's a new world for cinema, and ‘do it yourself’ material is generally more interesting and less formulaic than what comes out of ‘the biz.’”

Nichols’ film is part of a six-film festival coming to Georgia College this academic year. The series is funded in part by a partnership South Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

The Georgia College Library, the College of Arts and Sciences and Alpha Lambda Delta (freshman honor society) are sponsoring the campus screenings from these nationally recognized filmmakers.

“The series provides a unique aspect for students to learn from professional filmmakers and for the community to enjoy these great films that many times can only be viewed in major cities,” said Max Yarus, president of Alpha Lambda Delta.

Nichols’ film, “How to Make Movies at Home,” will be the first showcased Sunday Sept. 15 in Russell Auditorium at 3 p.m.

“It is a story about a ‘band’ of filmmakers who have been making films in their small Maine town since they were kids.  They are dedicated locals, with no interest in going off to Hollywood and they have a close relationship with the mayor,” said Nichols. “Their way of life is threatened when a major studio arrives to make a deal to shoot a TV show in town and the band has to struggle to survive.”

All other films will be screened in the Arts & Sciences Auditorium at 3 p.m.

Other films and screening dates are:

  • “Birth of the Living Dead”- Oct. 20
  • “GMO OMG”- Nov. 17
  • “The Iran Job”- Feb. 9
  • “Finding Hillywood”- March 9
  • “The New Public”- April 13

The screenings are free and open to the public. Filmmakers will also visit Georgia College classes to teach students more about their art.

For more information on the film festival and scheduled screenings, visit South Arts website.

To find out more about the screening at Georgia College, visit libguides.gcsu.edu/scif.

 

ABOUT GEORGIA COLLEGE: Georgia College, the state’s designated Public Liberal Arts University, combines the educational experience expected at esteemed private liberal arts colleges with the affordability of public higher education. Its four colleges – arts and sciences, business, education and health sciences – provide 6,600 undergraduate and graduate students with an exceptional learning environment that extends beyond the classroom, with hands-on involvement with faculty research, community service, study abroad and myriad internships.

Founded in 1889, Georgia College boasts one of the most beautiful campuses in the nation with Corinthian columns fronting red brick buildings and wide open green spaces. Georgia College also offers graduate education at the historic Jefferson building in downtown Macon, at Robins Air Force Base and online.

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For more information, contact University Communications at (478) 445-4477.


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